The Benefits of a Hearing Aid Telecoil (T-Coil) for Wireless Connectivity in a Public Venue

The Benefits of a Hearing Aid Telecoil for Wireless Connectivity in a Public Venue. Dr. Cliff Olson, Audiologist and founder of Applied Hearing Solutions in Anthem Arizona, discusses Telecoils and why they are so important for hearing better in a public venue.

Website: https://www.AppliedHearingAZ.com

Phonak: https://www.Phonak.com

Recently, Bluetooth has taken all of the wireless attention when it comes to hearing aids. However, telecoils are considered the original form of wireless hearing aid communication and could be the single best feature for hearing better in a public venue such as a church, movie theater, performance theater, or convention center.

All you have to do is look for a blue sign with a picture of an ear with a line through it, with a little “T” in the corner. This means that all you have to do is activate your Telecoil and you will be able to hear better in that environment.

A telecoil also allows you to hear better on a telecoil enabled phone. If you have trouble on the telephone, a telecoil could be your best friend. Just look for a phone with a “T” rating. These ratings range from 1 to 4 and number 4 is the best.

A telecoil, also know as a T-Coil is an extremely small coil of wire that can be installed inside of a hearing aid. This T-Coil can pick up Electro-Magnetic signals from an Induction Loop that is installed inside of one of these facilities. Imagine that you go to a town hall meeting in your home town. If that facility has an Induction Loop connected to their sound system, the T-coil could pick up the sound of whoever is speaking into the microphone at the meeting and send it directly into your ears making their speech significantly clearer than with just using your hearing aid microphones alone.

While telecoils are small, they do take up valuable real estate inside of a hearing aid. This is why many manufacturers have elected to remove the telecoil from their devices or have made their devices larger.

However, Phonak, has been able to keep the size of their devices small. Their new Audeo Marvel 13T and Audeo Marvel 312T hearing aids are super small and still have a telecoil inside of them. But Phonak didn’t stop there. They were also able to keep Bluetooth Classic and Binaural VoiceStream Technology (BVST).

With Phonak’s Bluetooth hearing aids, you can connect directly to any smartphone including Android and iPhone. This means you can play audio directly from your smart device right into your hearing aids. This includes Phone calls, Podcasts, Music, YouTube videos, or any other audio that plays from your Smart Device.

Somehow, Phonak has also been able to keep Binaural VoiceStream Technology (BVST) inside of their devices. This allows each hearing aid to communicate with the other to help you hear better in a background noise situation.

The fact that Phonak made a hearing aid without sacrificing other wireless features is truly impressive.

Even though Telecoils don’t garner as much excitement as other wireless hearing aid technologies such as Bluetooth, they could still be the single most important feature when it comes to hearing better in a background noise situation.

Comments

chrluc says:

My first set of hearing aids didn’t have a telecoil. My current Audiologist really pushed the telecoil, so I decided to go with it. I have yet to find a place where I can use it. I looked into putting a telecoil in my home for the tv, just to create a reason to have them, but the cost of the amp and the installation of the wire made the whole process expensive and very difficult. I can quickly and easily add a TV steamer, and it cost less, without having to pull up carpet or climb around in the attic. We have a few venues in my city were they have a telecoil, but they’re places I never frequent. So basically their only purpose is to watch the TV in my Audiologist clinic that plays hearing aid ads on repeat…

Jorge Omar Cosme Rivera says:

Hi dr. Olson,

I’ve been using the Marvel 90 13T for a week, I’m happy for the most part. I wanted the rechargeable one but with no version with Tcoil until fall 2019, I just can’t wait.

Found that this tcoils are not as good as the ones on my old virto, I miss the duo phone (hear phone calls with t coil on both ears simultaneously, really improved sound quality)

And the Bluetooth streaming is great overall except that the hearing aids can’t store the pairing data for more than one devices meaning you need to do the pairing process from scratch every time you switch devices and it so tedious that I opt to use only my iPhone.

And thanks for you Videos, I’ve learned more about hearing aids in the past month than in the last 19 years using them.

N Popham says:

Also, my hearing aides have a telecoil channel that hasn’t been turned on since I only have 4 channels so they’re currently doing other things. However, thanks to this video I looked up my phone’s rating and it is T4. Does that mean that if I turn on the telecoil channel I will hear better on phone calls? Or is there other steps I would have to take with the T-coil and my phone? Thanks!

psusarahkate says:

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Aditya Tannu says:

All current iPhones have a T4 rating https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202186

JoAnne Hirsch - CDHS says:

This is probably the best video I’ve seen promoting T-Coil. I would also add that you can use a hard connected neckloop into the jack of a person’s home phone, such as an amplified phone, so sound will travel from the phone to your hearing aids wirelessly. Telecommunications programs, such as the one in Colorado (https://ccdhh.com/index.php/ctprogram/), promote T-Coil and encourage consumers to ask their audiologists to include it in their hearing aids, for this important reason. And it doesn’t deplete the battery as much as when a person is using Bluetooth.

Mick Lapworth says:

I’m really interested in the Phonak aids but I use Bicros hearing aids from Widex. As I understand it Phonak don’t do Bicros in their latest aids, I’m I right?

kashif M says:

interesting…like how you demonstrate with and without T-Coil, very helpful to know

Jim Davis says:

This is the best info on Tcoils. I share your vids on Facebook I have a old loop system and I think I’ll wire my office. We dispense lots of Phonak Marvels. They are the best. Thanks Friend.

Chris Nicklo says:

Thanks, as always, for the video. Agree that television can make a difference, and I wear Widex Evoke which also includes a telecoil. My only wish for your viewers is that you had spent a few seconds talking about the relative lack of availability of telecoil-enabled locations (at least here in the U.S.). Telecoils are a great example of a promising technology with very little presence that users can benefit from. The video gets people excited without letting them know that they’ll have few opportunities to use a telecoil in their everyday life.

James Stowell says:

My Signia NX series has been streaming voice/music over my iPhone 8 for over 18 months with T coil, BT, 13 battery and voice streaming, https://www.signiausa.com/

Ron Henning says:

Does the Phonak M-R 90 automatically pick up sound from a T-Coil when you enter a room that is sending sound through a T-Coil or is there some way to turn it on and off through the hearing aid or it’s app?

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